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2014 Grassroots Tentative Schedule

AIA-Accordion

 

Schedule Overview

The abbreviated schedule below will give you a feeling for the general conference schedule. We have also included overviews of the Plenary and Workshops on Friday. Specifics might change. Please check back for the latest information or contact us with any questions you might have.

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Schedule: Wednesday, March 19

 

 

9.00 a.m. - noon

 

Government and Community Relations Office Hours
Have questions about the AIA advocacy agenda and initiatives? Want some last-minute tips and guidance on tomorrow’s Capitol Hill visits. Please stop by during the designated hours to chat with your colleagues. Members of the Government and Community Relations team will be on hand to talk with you about government relations resources to help you and your component.

9:30 a.m. - noon

 

CACE Meeting
(for CACE members only)

12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

 

Contract Documents Sales Meeting
(for CACE members only)

1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

 

AIA First-timers Get-together

2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

 

Opening Plenary Session

5:15 p.m. – 6:35 p.m.

 

Regional Meetings/Regional Dinners

Schedule: Thursday, March 20

 

 

7:15 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

 

Government Advocacy
Networking Breakfast and Legislative Agenda

9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

 

Capitol Hill Visits
Meet with members of Congress to discuss federal issues that are important to you, your community, the profession, and the AIA.

4:00 p.m. - 5:30/5:45 p.m.

 

GENERAL SESSION
The Introduction of Candidates for Office, Repositioning and the Proposed Bylaws Amendments

6:00 p.m.

 

Institute Open House

Schedule: Friday, March 21

 

 

6:45 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.

 

GENERAL SESSION: ASSOCIATION OF THE FUTURE

6:45 a.m. Breakfast available

7:15 a.m. Program begins

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

 

Leadership Plenary Sessions and Component Operations Sessions
Choose from six concurrent courses (see below).
Attendees receive 1.5 LUs unless noted otherwise.

10:10 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

 

Leadership Plenary Sessions and Component Operations Sessions
Choose from six concurrent courses (see below).
Attendees receive 1.5 LUs unless noted otherwise.

11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

 

Awards Luncheon

1:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

 

Leadership Plenary Sessions and Component Operations Sessions
Choose from six concurrent courses (see below).
Attendees receive 1.5 LUs unless noted otherwise.

2:45 .pm. - 4:00 p.m.

 

CLOSING GENERAL SESSION

Advocacy Deep Dive Breakout Sessions (Wednesday, March 19)

As a newcomer, veteran, or someone honing their advocacy skills, members will have an opportunity to participate in 1 of 3 different breakout sessions to learn more about the issues prior to their Capitol Hill visits.

Breakout Session 1. Survivor: Capitol Hill (Columbia A Room)

Is this your first time visiting Capitol Hill to meet with your elected representatives? Are you excited? Nervous? Scared? If so, this session is for you. Designed for first-time Grassroots attendees, this session will discuss what really happens in a Capitol Hill office, what a typical Hill visit looks and feels like and how you can prepare for the meeting.

Breakout Sessions 2-4: Getting More out of your Meetings

As an experienced Grassroots veteran, you know how to make the AIA’s “asks.” But in a hyper-partisan environment, how can we make sure that our asks are answered the best way? This session will explore how to navigate the politics of Capitol Hill, how to respond to the tough questions, and how to make sure that–no matter whether you are from a Red or Blue State–the AIA’s agenda moves forward.

Columbia B Room: For attendees who live in the Pacific Time Zone

Capitol A Room: For attendees who live in the Mountain and Central Time Zones

Capitol B Room: For attendees who live in the Eastern Time Zones

Breakout Session 5: Beyond Grassroots (Congressional A Room)

Advocacy is not simply something to do once a year. It requires a 365 day-a-year effort. But how do you maintain the momentum from Grassroots when you get back home? This session will explore the most effective ways to building lasting relationships with Congressional offices, how to turn friends into champions for architecture, and how the AIA’s new Advocacy Network can help you help the profession.

We have three Plenary and Component Operations Time Slots on Friday.
Participants can choose from six concurrent courses during each session.

Session ONE (8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.)

AIA-Accordion

 

Workshop A1. Effective Governance (1.5 LUs)

Glenn Tecker, Chair and Co-CEO, Tecker International, LLC, Yardley, PA

As volunteer leaders, board members play an important role in the success of the organization. What are the modes of governance? How will the new AIA national governance structure impact members and the profession? How should boards’ think and lead to result in a better governed organization? This workshop will explore the fundamentals of effective governance by defining the basic roles and responsibilities of any board and examine strategies, including the future AIA governance model, for building effective board structures. Participants will also address how to develop professional relationships between board and staff and ways to sustain healthy communication and relationships in the interest of the members.

Learning objectives:
Discuss the purpose of the board and duties of directors.
Explore effective governance models.
Distinguish governance (board) from management (staff) roles.
Examine how to set strategic direction and realistic goals.

Workshop A2. How the AIA Works and What It Can Do For (and With) You!

Presented by members of AIA National

This interactive session will begin with a broad overview of how the AIA national component is focused through the lens of Repositioning. In Repositioning the Institute, the AIA Board adopted the vision statement that “ …the AIA will focus our priorities to (1) Elevate public awareness, (2) Advocate the profession, and (3) Expand and share knowledge.” AIA national staff areas will discuss specific programs and activities that support these priorities. Come ready with questions and leave with ideas on ways to align your state and local programs and initiatives.

Learning objectives:
Identify resources for strengthening AIA member value.
Explore the programs and resources offered by AIA national to support the goals of your component.
Discuss how to use these resources.
Share information and ideas on programs.

Workshop A3. Maximizing Your Component’s Non-Dues Revenue Potential (1.5 LUs)

Rusty Bienvenue, Executive Director, AIA Houston
Sally Fly, Hon. AIA. Executive Director, AIA Austin
Melissa Hunt, Executive Director, AIA Central Oklahoma

Nondues revenue can bridge the budgetary gap and support important member services. One of the best ways to keep the budget on the positive side of things is by offering products and services to members that both bring money into the association and give members’ valuable add-on that they can’t get anywhere else, reinforcing the importance of their memberships Learn new ideas and options that will give members a bit more value for their dollars. Presenters will demonstrate how to organize and coordinate fundraising efforts to have maximum impact with minimum effort. You will also hear success stories and trade secrets for raising funds more efficiently.

Learning objectives:
Share successful and not-so-successful component programs.
Recognize potential program options.
Identify tried and true methods for raising non-dues revenue.
Hear trade secrets for raising funds more efficiently.

Workshop A4. How can 501(c)3 and 501(c)6 Organizations Work Together?

Jenifer Holland, Senior Governance Consultant, BoardSource, Washington, DC

Components fulfill a vital role to advance the architecture profession at the state and local levels, and indeed, internationally. They have made a significant impact in leading the profession through information, networking and advocacy for more than 150 years.  In recent years, some chapters have complemented their 501(c)6-organized advocacy and professional advancement work through the creation of associated 501(c)3 organizations. Often created to offer scholarships and/or community education and outreach, 501(c)3 activity can enhance the work of AIA state and local chapters. However, establishing and sustaining a successful 501(c)3 organization requires intentionality, planning, and an understanding of the differences between the two types of IRS exemptions. Join us for an interactive session to discuss the differences in these two organizational structures and the opportunities for mutually-supportive arrangements.

Learning objectives:
Identify similarities between 501c3 and 501c6 status.
Discuss differences between 501c3 and 501c6 status.
Examine how 501c3 and 501c6 can work together and support each other.
Discuss business operations.

Workshop A5. Succession Planning

Bruce Lesley, Senior Governance Consultant, BoardSource, Washington, DC
This session will be repeated at 1:00 –2:30 p.m.

Succession planning is about much more than the transition of an executive director. It is about ensuring that the board and staff are prepared for the change, and that the proper systems and processes are in place so that a change in any key position does not result in organizational disruptions, or in some cases catastrophe. This workshop will focus on strategic leader development, emergency succession and defined– departure succession.

Learning objectives:
Distinguish between executive transition and succession planning.
Identify succession planning steps.
Provide guidelines to managing the executive search and transition.
Determine processes and procedures that need to be in place.

Workshop A6: Understanding Your Component’s Financial Responsibilities (1.5 LUs)

Subrina L. Wood, CPA, Tax Manager, Tate & Tryron, Washington, DC
This workshop will be repeated from 1:00–2:30 p.m.

Sound financial management is essential to the effective operation of every component. Despite the downturn in the current economy, local and state components must remain financially viable by working to keep revenues strong, expenses down, and members served. Boards of directors, especially officers, have serious fiscal responsibilities. The panelists will cover the basics of developing sound financial information and concise financial reports, presenting this information to your component board, and being prepared for IRS audits. The panelists will also discuss Sarbanes-Oxley and its impact on associations, the 990 form and new IRS rules, and insurance issues affecting components.

Learning objectives:
Summarize sound financial processes, necessary record keeping, and internal control documents.
Explore ways to avoid IRS audits and embezzlement.
Discuss processes for developing policies, avoiding common mistakes, and creating a policy manual to comply with the IRS 990.
Explain essential insurance needs for components.

Session TWO (10:10 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.)

AIA-Accordion

 

Workshop B1. Association Law and Ethics Made Easy: What You Need to Know to Avoid Governance Problems

Jay Stephens, Esq., General Counsel and Vice President, AIA National
This workshop is repeated from 1:00–2:30 p.m.

In these turbulent times, nonprofits must examine the legal and ethical roles and responsibilities and proper activities of their boards of directors and determine whether these roles have changed as a result of the economy. What role should the board play in the day-to-day operation of the organization? What are the potential liabilities of board members? How do you lower your risk of being sued? This session will provide practical information on how to minimize the legal risks and obligations of board members of nonprofit organizations and how boards can effectively deal with the challenges they face.

Learning objectives:
Summarize basic legal and ethical issues that nonprofits face every day.
Determine how to anticipate, avoid, and address legal and ethical problems.
Examine antitrust and governance issues.
Explore practical tips and techniques for managing legal risks and responsibilities and avoiding ethics violations.

Workshop B2. Getting the Job Done with Volunteers: The All-Volunteer Component Experience

Michael Johnson, AIA, Advocacy Chair, AIA Savannah

Andrew Mitchell, AIA, President, AIA Fort Wayne

Anne Saint-Aignan, AIA, 2013 President, AIA Central Kentucky

Administering continuing education programs, recruiting members, producing newsletters, keeping members informed – to name a few of the volunteer staff responsibilities – are often hectic, stressful, and sometimes more than the volunteer can handle. However, you can still have a “life” and enjoy the experience. Hear from colleagues and share your experiences about the challenges and rewards of managing an all-volunteer component. This workshop will also explore how to recruit volunteers, how to determine when staff is needed, and how to generate non-dues revenue.

Learning objectives:
Discuss maximizing your resources and recruiting volunteers.
Recognize if/when staff is needed and explore how to get it.
Examine volunteer supervision and decision-making.
Explore prioritizing, delegating, and accountability.

Workshop B3: Leadership Programs that Enhance Career Advancement

Moderator: Josh Flowers, AIA, Knowledge Director, AIA National Young Architects Forum
Corinne Cassidy, AIA, President, AIA Cincinnati
Douglas Richards, AIA, Founder, VISION: Architects Leadership Forum, AIA Cincinnati

Bill Seider, FAIA, Regional Director, AIA Northwest and Pacific Region
Michael Waldinger, Hon. AIA, Executive Vice President, AIA Illinois

AIA components at every tier of membership have developed training for emerging professionals who want to gain skills necessary to advance to higher levels within the architecture profession and the greater community. Hear from three components that have established robust emerging professionals programs. At the local level, AIA Cincinnati’s VISION: Architects Leadership Forum is designed for emerging professional architects who want to gain skills necessary to advance their careers, communities and the profession. The AIA Illinois Leadership Institute brings together emerging and experienced leaders from across the state for a one day forum on leadership. The AIA Northwest & Pacific Region Leadership Institute works with recognized student leaders from the region's schools of architecture for a one year exploration of leadership. Come prepared to participate in an interactive and engaging discussion on programming for the younger generation of leaders.

Learning objectives:
Describe knowledge areas critical to the career advancement of emerging professionals.
Explain the importance of providing opportunities to emerging professionals.
Recognize the importance of getting emerging professionals involved in AIA components.
Communicate the benefits of programs to the component board and membership.

Workshop B4. High-Performing Boards: Effective Practices of Successful Boards (1.5 LUs)

Glenn Tecker, Chair and co-CEO, Tecker International, LLC, Yardley, PA

Opinions on what the proper role for the board of directors are divergent, ranging from a conviction that the board should simply raise money and focus on policy to the view that the board can and indeed must take on a more robust set of responsibilities. The investment in building board effectiveness is worthwhile because the pressure on nonprofit organizations is increasing. An effective board is an essential element of organizational capacity. Great boards, once developed, inspire individual expertise, strategic guidance, financial support, and passion required to fulfill an organization’s highest aspirations. What defines an exceptional board and what are the variables to the equation? This session will describe principles in detail and present best practices and practical applications to achieve peak performance.

Learning objectives:
Define different board performance levels.
Explore the variables of an exceptional board.
Identify and maximize the collective judgment and wisdom of your board.
Share best practices of high performance boards.

Workshop B5. Knowing and Selling Your Organization (1.5 LUs)

JW Blanchard, Assoc. AIA, Member, AIA Membership Committee
Cheryl Jacobs, Executive Director, AIA Miami
Kate Shelton, Executive Director, AIA Charlotte and Member, AIA Membership Committee

As you represent the AIA and recruit new members, can you briefly articulate the value of AIA membership? Do you know how to find information about the AIA? What types of services and programs can you implement to keep existing members and attract new ones? Which programs should you offer to foster inclusiveness and attract diverse constituents? This workshop will address how to continue to add value to membership. The panelists will also explore strategies for structuring, implementing, and maintaining active members.

Learning objectives:
Discuss membership recruitment and retention.
Examine the importance of being a member of the AIA.
Explore why people join the AIA and why they leave.
Explore how to and what adds value to AIA membership.

Workshop B6: Personal Leadership: Creating a Plan of Action

Peter A. DeLisle, PhD, Director, Posey Leadership, Austin College, Sherman, TX

This workshop will explore the topic of leader effectiveness as an interdependent model engaging key constructs of personal and situational awareness, the ability to bring influence to bear on people and organizations, and the acceptance of responsibility and the commitment to the duties of leadership. In addition, the plenary session will examine competency as the level of mastery in a specific professional field. Mastery can be described as people performing at a level of capability in which they are exceptionally successful, and are increasingly self-organizing and self-managing. Technical, interpersonal, and resource utilization (planning, organizing and controlling) behaviors will also be explored. The program will describe the process of determining competency and the process for benchmarking performance.

Learning objectives:
Develop a personal leadership plan.
Develop self-awareness through critical self-reflection.
Recognize leader effectiveness and distinguish between transformational verses transitional leadership.
Optimize your own potential.

Session THREE (1:15 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.)

AIA-Accordion

 

Workshop C1. Association Law and Ethics Made Easy: What You Need to Know to Avoid Governance Problems

Jay Stephens, Esq., General Counsel and Vice President, AIA National

In these turbulent times, nonprofits must examine the legal and ethical roles and responsibilities and proper activities of their boards of directors and determine whether these roles have changed as a result of the economy. What role should the board play in the day-to-day operation of the organization? What are the potential liabilities of board members? How do you lower your risk of being sued? This session will provide practical information on how to minimize the legal risks and obligations of board members of nonprofit organizations and how boards can effectively deal with the challenges they face.

Learning objectives:
Summarize basic legal and ethical issues that nonprofits face every day.
Determine how to anticipate, avoid, and address legal and ethical problems.
Examine antitrust and governance issues.
Explore practical tips and techniques for managing legal risks and responsibilities and avoiding ethics violations.

Workshop C2. Board Assess Thyself: Board Self-Assessment (1.5 LUs)

Jenifer Holland, Senior Governance Consultant, BoardSource, Washington, DC

Boards are ultimately responsible for their component, yet they spend little time examining their performance. Fundraising, budgets, and policies take meeting time away from the bigger picture. A board self-assessment puts governance in perspective by allowing the board to review its responsibilities and ask “How can we improve so that we better help the organization? This workshop will define criteria for an effective board, outline the benefits of a board self-assessment, describe the self-assessment process, and identify steps that need to be taken after the self-assessment process. It is necessary for boards to review their performance to continually move in a positive director.

Learning objectives:
Review board roles.
Discuss benefits of self-assessment
Identify characteristics of a good self-assessment and levels of board assessment.
Explain the self-assessment process.

Workshop C3: Getting Connected: How to Get Involved in Community Outreach (1.5 LUs)

Roger K. Lewis, FAIA, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland

Are you interested in getting involved in community outreach and you’re not sure how to get started or what’s involved? Do you want to make an impact on the role that architects can have in creating healthy, sustainable and quality-designed environments in their communities by being involved? This session will focus on tips and strategies you can use to get involved in community outreach programs and the best ways to raise awareness about the profession of architecture.

Learning objectives:
Examine how to appropriately position yourself for success.
Discuss the do’s and don’ts of cultivating successful relationships in the media, newspapers and other outlets.
Summarize tips and techniques on how to get involved in community outreach.
Discuss the benefits of community engagement.

Workshop C4: Leading through Change (1.5 LUs)

Seth Kahan, Exemplar in Change Management, Writer and Author, Visionary Leadership, Bethesda, MD

People get comfortable performing tasks and processes in a particular manner, but what happens when there is change. This comfort provides them with the security that they are masters of their own environment. But what causes us to fear change and disruptions in our lives? Leaders can help the change process by changing their attitude from avoidance to acceptance. The goal of the AIA Repositioning initiative is to provide the AIA and its members with the insights and messages it needs to effect real change.” However, architects must change avoidance questions and statements into acceptance questions from “why” to “what new opportunities will this provide the profession;” from “we do not do it this way” to “what would it look like;” from” how will this affect the profession” to “what problems can be solved.” This workshop will address the process of change and the path that architects must take to guide and lead the process of change.

Learning objectives:
Attain skills to better understand the change process.
Determine how to be a catalyst for change.
Become more proactive in successfully affecting change.
Explore how to apply the stages of change in anticipating people’s responses and reactions.

Workshop C5: Succession Planning (1.5 LUs)

Bruce Lesley, Senior Governance Consultant, BoardSource, Washington, DC
This session will be repeated at 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Succession planning is about much more than the transition of an executive director. It is about ensuring that the board and staff are prepared for the change, and that the proper systems and processes are in place so that a change in any key position does not result in organizational disruptions, or in some cases catastrophe. This workshop will focus on strategic leader development, emergency succession and defined– departure succession.

Learning objectives:
Distinguish between executive transition and succession planning.
Identify succession planning steps.
Provide guidelines to managing the executive search and transition.
Determine processes and procedures that need to be in place.

Workshop C6: Understanding Your Component’s Financial Responsibilities (1.5 LUs)

Subrina L. Wood, CPA, Tax Manager, Tate and Tryon, Washington, DC.
This session will be repeated at 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Sound financial management is essential to the effective operation of every component. Despite the downturn in the current economy, local and state components must remain financially viable by working to keep revenues strong, expenses down, and members served. Boards of directors, especially officers, have serious fiscal responsibilities. The panelists will cover the basics of developing sound financial information and concise financial reports, presenting this information to your component board, and being prepared for IRS audits. The panelists will also discuss Sarbanes-Oxley and its impact on associations, the 990 form and new IRS rules, and insurance issues affecting components.

Learning objectives:
Summarize sound financial processes, necessary record keeping, and internal control documents.
Explore ways to avoid IRS audits and embezzlement.
Discuss processes for developing policies, avoiding common mistakes, and creating a policy manual to comply with the IRS 990.
Explain essential insurance needs for components.

Go Back to the main Grassroots page

 

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