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AIA Northern Virginia Design Awards: Home Knows No Style

For residential architecture clients, the design of one’s own living space is a deeply personal process, resulting in homes that reflect their owner’s (and perhaps their architect’s) vision and personality.

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Award of Excellence for Residential Architecture

308 Mulberry in Lewes, Del., designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect. Jury comments: We were extremely impressed with how the architect created a new modern addition that seamlessly coexists with the historic structure. The architect carefully restored the original house, which acts as portal to the rear addition. We were pleased with the surprise that awaits visitors to this house, which demonstrates how Modern architecture can work in concert with historic artifacts. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Award of Excellence for Residential Architecture

Award of Excellence for Residential Architecture: Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion in Bethesda, Md., designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect. Jury comments: This is a simple design with very difficult detailing. We like the floating roof with its solids and voids. It is a beautiful enclosure in the landscape. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Award of Excellence for Historic Architecture

Award of Excellence for Historic Architecture: Lombardy in Talbot County, Md., designed by Neumann Lewis Buchanan Architects. Jury comments: The house is magnificent, with good scale between the larger wooden structure and the smaller brick structure. The restoration erases many of the additional “crimes” perpetrated on the original building. Image courtesy of Gordon Beall.

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture: Barcode Residence in Washington, D.C., designed by David Jameson Architect. Jury comments: We were interested in the way this addition creates its own space that extends to the adjacent structures via its glass envelope. The design has a clarity and strength; the architect remained true to the concept. Image courtesy of Paul Warchol.

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture: Elk Run Ridge in Churchville, Va., designed by Carter + Burton Architecture. Jury comments: We were impressed by the strength and simplicity of the design. This project was a good example of the graphic quality of the plan and section reinforcing the beauty of the design solution. It’s a beautiful way to treat the crest of the hill. Image courtesy of James Burton, AIA.

Award of Merit for Commercial Architecture

Award of Merit for Commercial Architecture: RdV Vineyards Winery in Delaplane, Va., designed by Neumann Lewis Buchanan Architects. Jury comments: The two distinct sides of the vineyard are connected with a light-filled silo. It is sited well into the landscape, and keeps the farmhouse scale to elements. The barrel catacombs are impressive. We’re looking forward to the wine being as good as the architecture. Image courtesy of Andrew Lewis, AIA.

Award of Merit for Historic Architecture

Award of Merit for Historic Architecture: Renovation to a Maine Seaside Home in Bar Harbor, Maine, designed by Barnes Vanze Architects, Inc. Jury comments: The landscaping and siting are important in the overall composition. The tactful renovations keep the original house’s identity. It is designed to grow from generation to generation. The architects exercised restraint in editing the house. Image courtesy of James R. Salomon Photography.

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture: Graticule in Great Falls, Va., designed by David Jameson Architect. Jury comments: This white building contrasts with the surrounding landscape with a purity of form and layering. It has complexity and ambiguity, like paper folded into walls. The white will be ever-changing with the seasons. Image courtesy of Nic Lehoux.

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture

Award of Merit for Residential Architecture: Tea House in Bethesda, Md., designed by David Jameson Architect. Jury comments: Everyone should have a tea house. It is simple and beautiful. The room becomes the object. We hope we can be invited to tea soon. Image courtesy of Paul Warchol.

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture: Cape Cod Cottage in Truro, Mass., designed by David Jones Architects. Jury comments: This project is original in form, adding freshness to a traditional salt box concept. It is an unusual collection of masses. There is a quality of views without having an all-glass building. Image courtesy of Peter Vanderwarker.

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture: Wissioming2 in Bethesda, Md., designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect. Jury Comments: This project is working to be part of the outside, and it works well in the landscape surrounding it. It is a simple parti in plan -- two rectangles rotated in a playful execution. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Jurors’ Citation for Commercial Interiors

Jurors’ Citation for Commercial Interiors: Teknion Showroom in Washington, D.C., designed by KGD Architecture. Jury comments: We liked the simple, straightforward plan of a combination of showroom and office. It is always on show. The white is the backdrop for all the furniture. This will allow the showroom to be constantly changing. Image courtesy of Ron Blunt Photography.

Jurors’ Citation for Commercial Interiors

Jurors’ Citation for Commercial Interiors: Architectural Office in Washington, D.C., designed by SmithGroupJJR. Jury comments: This office steps out and makes a statement with a nice variety of spaces. We like the two sections with the rectangular workspace and curved social interactive space. The reduced work spaces develop more interesting shared spaces. Natural light penetrates deep into the building. Image courtesy of Eric Laignel.

Jurors’ Citation for Institutional Architecture

Jurors’ Citation for Institutional Architecture: Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church in Solomons, Md., designed by Cook Architecture. Jury comments: The views are spectacular from the water as you approach. The cupola?s spire and boat masts blend together.  The ceiling has the effect of an abstract sky, and it is a nicely lit space. Image courtesy of Ulf Wallin.

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture

Jurors’ Citation for Residential Architecture: Becherer House in Earlysville, Va., designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect. Jury comments: This project has traditional forms of massing, with three volumes developed. The volumes’ positions create defined exterior space. The traditional parti is interpreted in an untraditional way; it is new and not so new at the same time. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Jurors’ Citation for Conceptual/Unbuilt Architecture

Jurors’ Citation for Conceptual/Unbuilt Architecture: The Ministry of Public Health in Kabul, Afghanistan, designed by URS Corporation. Jury comments: This is an excellent organization of public spaces. The campus is designed around solids and voids, with the open spaces well defined. We are curious to see the project develop in the future. Image courtesy of URS Corporation.

A Los Angeles-based jury selected 16 projects for this year’s AIA Northern Virginia Design Awards, highlighting a wide range of residential buildings. Spanning a broad range of traditional renovations to contemporary urban insertions, there were coastal mansions lovingly restored, stylish glass and steel cubes, and abstracted takes on vernacular building types, staking out a middle ground between these two extremes.

Back to AIArchitect September 14, 2012

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