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AIA Maryland Awards Celebrate The Glass Cube

Since Modernism, the glass cube has become a universally aspirational form; idealized as perfectly rational, universally functional, and geometrically austere. AIA Maryland’s latest set of award recipients continues this aspiration with projects that use this symbol of perfect efficacy and function in a wide array of project types. There are houses that affix glass cubes to traditional architecture, classic Modernist cubes-in-space, and institutional facades that vary the opacity of glass with mathematic precision.

AIA-Slideshow

Public Building of the Year

<b>Morgan State University CBEIS in Baltimore,</b> designed by Hord Coplan Macht | FREELON.<br />Jury comments: This building deftly addresses the primary issues facing public architecture&mdash;social space, environmental impact, and fiscal restraint. The simplicity and directness of the striated plan, creates the clear order&mdash;the play with natural light, and surface articulation, enliven the spaces&mdash;both the labs and atrium. Image courtesy of Mark Herboth Photography.

Honor Award

<b>Dahlonega Residence in Bethesda, Md.,</b> designed by David Jameson Architect.<br />Jury comments: The steel frame as a design ordering device was brilliantly conceived and allowed the glass and exterior panels to create a strong visual composition. Image courtesy of Paul Warchol Photography.

Honor Award

<b>Drexel University Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design URBN Center in Philadelphia,</b> designed by Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle.<br />Jury comments: The jury recognized the challenge of working within an existing shell in general, and an iconic shell in particular. The insertion of the stair/atrium activates the interior while serving as both stage and proscenium, which connects various parts of the program physically and visually. Image courtesy of Lara Swimmer Photography.

Honor Award

<b>NaCl Residence in Bethesda, Md.,</b> desgined by David Jameson Architect.<br />Jury comments: The controlled disorder of the residence&rsquo;s form effectively informs its solution in creating a random, yet deliberate solution of scaleless spaces. The disappearing edges of the glazing reinforce this effect throughout the facades, creating dynamic and engaging viewing corridors into and out of the residence. Image courtesy of Paul Warchol Photography.

Honor Award

<b>John and Frances Angelos Law Center at the University of Baltimore,</b> designed by Ayers Saint Gross (Architect of Record) and Behnisch Architekten (Design Architect).<br />Jury comments: While the graphic sculptural form created by the intersecting &lsquo;L&rsquo;&mdash;volumes provides the striking identity, the larger success is the interior volume of the atrium. The building is context aware, and responds equally well to the prominent intersection, and the adjacent highway, with appropriate exterior spaces. Image courtesy of Brad Feinknopf, David Matthiesen.

Merit Award

<b>Riggins House</b> designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA.<br />Jury comments: Rigorous on approach, the residence&rsquo;s composition is intriguing, and its detailing is exceptional, inside and out. Although the plan is very open and cleanly refined, the home conveys warmth that would be enjoyable to visit or live in. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Merit Award

<b>The First Congregational United Church of Christ in Washington, D.C.,</b> designed by Cunningham | Quill Architects and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (Associated Architect).<br /> Jury comments: The careful approach and the tension that is created between the contemporary worship space placed underneath the cantilevered glass office building addresses and defines a difficult corner site. The materiality selection, the detailing, and the execution of the construction provide for a high quality solution. Image courtesy of Michael Moran Photography.

Merit Award

<b>Neustadt Creative Marketing in Baltimore,</b> designed by Ziger/Snead Architects.<br />Jury comments: This project is a great example of getting a lot out of a few simple moves. In particular, the jury appreciated the way the project takes advantage of the section over the conference table, and the subtle but critical move of pulling the wall that divides the collaborative spaces from the workstations, [which] provides visual and conceptual continuity in a limited space. Image courtesy of Karl Connolly Photography.

Merit Award

<b>The Andrew G. Truxal Library in Arnold, Md.,</b> designed by EwingCole and Ratio Architects (Associated Architects).<br />Jury comments: Campus buildings are by their nature fundamentally urban and contextual in some form. This addition and renovation intelligently reclaims some lost order through infill, seamlessly connecting to the campus along one edge, and creating a new identity along the other.  The new glass fa&ccedil;ade respects the geometric order of the campus, and provides variation and rhythm in its articulation. Image courtesy of Halkin Photography.

Merit Award

<b>Riggins House</b> designed by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA.<br /> Jury comments: The design for this residence effectively positions the solid versus the void, while maintaining a balance of forms. The approach to the residence is intriguing yet subtle, not giving away the dramatic openness that is yet to come. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Citation Award

<b>Merchant Point in Baltimore,</b> designed by Urban Design Group.<br />Jury comments: This project does a wonderful job of integrating the existing with the new in a way that compromises neither. Moreover, the comprehensive nature of the sustainability plan has the potential to create a truly diverse community that can expand and grow without losing the character that makes this community special. Image courtesy of HomeTrack.

Citation Award

<b>NOAA Center for Weather & Climate Prediction in College Park, Md.,</b> designed by HOK.<br />Jury comments: The NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction&rsquo;s arcing plan, and tilt in section, work to ground the form in its site and environment, presenting a striking figure in the landscape&mdash;an appropriate statement for the function of the facility. The design successfully deploys passive and active sustainable strategies for both significant environmental performance, and visual, formal, and spatial effect. Image courtesy of Alan Karchmer.

Citation Award

<b>The Treehouse designed by Cunningham | Quill Architects.</b><br />Jury comments: This pavilion and pool is a deceptively simple project, with its richness in craft and dichotomies in design being played out at every turn. It is simultaneously vernacular, Classical and Modern in its composition, seemingly based on multiple precedents. Image courtesy of Paul Burk Photography.

Citation Award

<b>Barrie School Learning Studio & Research Learning Lab in Silver Spring, Md.,</b> designed by Hord Coplan Macht.<br />Jury comments: The future of architecture will root itself clearly in the process and methods of fabrication that will allow for offsite construction and onsite installation. This project is great example of this process. The question is always how to create unique and appropriate places while using factory standardization.  The Barrie School not only creates unique architecture, it creates great space. Image courtesy of Tom Holdsworth.

Citation Award

<b>Ripley Street Folly in Silver Spring, Md.,</b> designed by Hord Coplan Macht.<br />Jury comments: Architecture done with whimsy has an important role in our environments.  In an era where the future of architecture looks to value sterile facades done by computer models, it is refreshing to see a designer who thought creatively and skillfully to create a moving, mechanical sculpture. It makes you aware of your place in a rich and playful execution of patterns, forms and connections. Image courtesy of Patrick Ross Photography.

Citation Award

<b>Farm in Baltimore County, Md.,</b> designed by Charles Brickbauer AIA Architect.<br />Jury comments: Inserting two obviously unique additions to an existing older structure is not an easy idea to pull off, but clearly the designer was up to the challenge. The result is a beautiful place with a design rooted in the proportioning structure of an older home. Image courtesy of Maxwell MacKenzie Architectural Photographer.

Citation Award

<b>The Long House in Lutherville&mdash;Timonium, Md.,</b> designed by McInturff Architects.<br />Jury comments: This is a very mature project. The expert use of the materials is distinctive, without being overwhelming. Image courtesy of Julia Heine / McInturff Architects.


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