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2010 INSTITUTE HONOR AWARDS FOR REGIONAL AND URBAN DESIGN RECIPIENT

Architecture

 

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Interior Architecture

 

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Regional & Urban Design

Greenwich South Strategic Framework


Photo 1 of 7

Notes of Interest

The primary goal of a study by the Alliance for Downtown New York was to produce a strategic framework for Greenwich South by establishing a set of key principles and objectives to guide both immediate and long-term growth. The architecture firm developed Five Principles to define a vision for the future of Greenwich South as a dense, reconnected, mixed-use neighborhood and lynchpin for Lower Manhattan. Each principle is comprised of a set of clear objectives to be achieved within these goals. In addition to establishing principles and setting goals, the firm also identified a series of clear opportunities for action—from the subtle, genius and immediate to the huge, radical and visionary—to achieve these goals. The project was highly collaborative, employing a Brain Trust as well as a Design Challenge charrette.

Architect

Architecture Research Office

   

Owner

Alliance for Downtown New York

   

Location

New York City

ADDITIONAL CREDITS

Associate Firm

Beyer Blinder Belle

   

Consultant

OPEN
Marc Kristal

   

Photo Credit

© Architecture Research Office


JURY COMMENTS

This project—comprising 41 acres
of Lower Manhattan—highlights
five key elements that bring
forethought to the inevitable
development that will take place
here: intense mix of uses,
reconnecting Greenwich Street,
connect east and west, build for
density and design for people, and
create a reason to come and a
reason to stay. An iterative
process brings together
pragmatists and visionaries to
address the longstanding
obstacles to urban connectivity in
Lower Manhattan. A critical
element to the sustainability of the
design is that it invites the public
to imagine and participate! The
potential of this extraordinary
large parcel, essentially forgotten
for decades, could result in a
reconnection that opens up
millions of square feet of
developable air rights.
Incorporating parks, old
buildings and new, a pedestrian-
oriented approach to way finding
underscores the value of broad
based planning and design
processes.


2010 INSTITUTE HONOR AWARDS FOR REGIONAL AND URBAN DESIGN JURY


John F. Torti, FAIA (Chair)
Torti Gallas & Partners, Inc.
Silver Spring, Maryland

Lance Jay Brown, FAIA
Lance Jay Brown Architecture & Urban Design
New York City

Brenda Scheer, AIA
University of Utah
College of Architecture + Planning
Salt Lake City

Edward K. Uhlir, FAIA
Uhlir Consulting, LLC
Chicago

Debby Wieneke
Habitat for Humanity of Benton County, Inc.
Bentonville, Arkansas

 

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