Sign In, Renew, Sign Up

Search AIA

Search AIA Go

Practicing ArchitectureAwards

Page Tools

CMD Insight for Architects

Advertisements

2010 AIA Housing Award Recipient

Category 2: One and Two-Family Production Homes

Cellophane House


Photo 1 of 7

 


    JURY COMMENTS

    This project gives hope that
    there is a new way of providing
    housing on the horizon; housing
    that produces energy as well as
    allows infinite variety within a kit-
    of-parts.

    The project considers full life-
    cycle implications, which is
    rarely done today.

    Finally, a significant step
    towards mass production
    techniques for creating housing
    that evidences the promise of
    transcending architectural
    novelty.

 


    2010 AIA Housing Awards
    Jury

    Andrew V. Porth, AIA, chair
    Porth Architects, Inc.
    Red Lodge, Mont.

    Natalye Appel, FAIA
    Natalye Appel + Associates
    Architects
    Houston

    Geoffrey Goldberg, AIA
    G. Goldberg and Associates
    Chicago

    Grace Kim, AIA
    Schemata Workshop
    Seattle

    Jane Kolleeny
    Architectural Record
    and
    GreenSource

    New York City

 

Architect

KieranTimberlake

   

Owner

KieranTimberlake

   

Location

New York


Notes of Interest

This project is a five-story dwelling that demonstrates a holistic approach to off-site fabrication. It is first and foremost a matrix for holding materials together to create an inhabitable enclosure. The aluminum frame provides the structure and the means to attach factory-made elements like floors, ceilings, stairs, bathrooms, and mechanical rooms. When it is no longer needed, the house can be disassembled. Then the materials can be moved, reused or recycled, helping to offset the millions of tons of construction and demolition debris generated in the United States each year.

The outer walls of the building are made from transparent PET – the material used in soda bottles – and are laminated with thin-film photovoltaic cells. The transparency allows sunlight to filter through the house, while solar power is harnessed through PV cells, enabling the house to function off-grid.

The house is not site-specific, and can therefore adapt to a range of climatic factors, solar orientations, slopes and adjacencies. Homeowners can alter the array of materials and floor plans as desired and regardless of the changes, the method of fabrication remains the same.

The house was fabricated off-site in a factory, where it was segregated into “chunks” which were put together simultaneously. After delivery to the site, the house was erected on-site in just sixteen days.

ADDITIONAL CREDITS

Consultant

 

F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.
Arup Lighting

     

Engineer

 

CVM Engineers

     

General Contractor

 

Kullman Buildings Corporation

     

Landscape Architect

 

Patrick Brennan

     

Photo Credit

 

© Peter Aaron/Esto
© Albert Vecerka/Esto

 

Footer Navigation

Copyright & Privacy

  • © The American Institute of Architects
  • Privacy