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2010 AIA/HUD Secretary’s Award Recipient

Category 1: Excellence in Affordable Housing Design

Paseo Senter at Coyote Creek


Photo 1 of 7

 


    JURY COMMENTS

    A delightful project showing an
    exuberance of life and culture.

    Its admirable translation of the
    plaza and paseo prototypes
    contribute a human scale and
    sense of place. This is housing
    that makes a community, where
    one was sorely needed. 

 


    2010 AIA/HUD
    Secretary’s Awards
    Jury

    Andrew V. Porth, AIA, chair
    Porth Architects, Inc.
    Red Lodge, Mont.

    Natalye Appel, FAIA
    Natalye Appel + Associates
    Architects
    Houston

    Geoffrey Goldberg, AIA
    G. Goldberg and Associates
    Chicago

    Grace Kim, AIA
    Schemata Workshop
    Seattle

    Jane Kolleeny
    Architectural Record
    and
    GreenSource

    New York City

    Luis F. Borray, Assoc. AIA
    U.S. Department of Housing
    & Urban Development
    Washington, D.C.

    Regina C. Gray, PhD
    U.S. Department of Housing
    & Urban Development
    Washington, D.C.

 

Architect

David Baker + Partners, Architects

   

Owner

Charities Housing/ The CORE Companies

   

Location

San Jose, Calif.


Notes of Interest

This project proposed to create a “place” in a disconnected, somewhat forgotten section of the city. Historically a pomegranate orchard, the 4.7 acres of land had become a series of abandoned and neglected parcels compromised by a floodplain and unusable by the city or community. The developer facilitated a land swap between the city and a private owner to preserve the continuity of the open green space to the south of the development and to enable the building of dense, resource-rich urban housing near the roadway.

A new urban district, this affordable neighborhood fronts a newly created main walking street, or paseo, that connects the arterial roadway to the area’s adjacent park. At its midpoint, the paseo widens into a public plaza that holds the main entries to the two residential districts. Lined at ground level with active uses, the paseo bustles with activity of entry stoops and retail-style social services, including a community room, Native American library, social worker spaces, gym, pool, playground and daycare center. The property is 100% handicapped- and wheelchair-accessible, and the pool features an automatic lift.

The bold color palette has proved extremely popular with residents and the community, who consider the project a signature addition to the neighborhood. The lively colors and configurations of this project have transformed the area by inspiring absentee landlords to improve adjacent properties.

The project begins to fill a real need in the community: At its opening, 3,100 applications were received for the 218 rental units. There are units reserved for

single-parent households, formerly homeless tenants, and victims of domestic violence. Additionally, the development features high density for a mainly suburban area: 44 units per acre. It exceeds Title 24, California’s already strict energy-efficiency standards, by 15%. Energy use is very low, reducing the utility costs borne by low-income residents.

ADDITIONAL CREDITS

Consultant

 

Guiliani & Kull
Belden Consulting Engineers

     

Engineer

 

OLMM Consulting Engineers

     

General Contractor

 

CORE Builders

     

Photo Credit

 

© Jeffrey Peters/Vantage Point Photography
© Anne Hamersky, Photographer

 

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