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University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hostpital

Award: 2013 AIA Healthcare Design Award Recipient
Category B: Built, More than $25 million (construction cost)

AIA-Slideshow

LANDSCAPING

The siting of the new hospital helped to substantially reduce the heat island effect for the campus; it was built on an existing parking lot. The facility is very well-landscaped, including a roof garden which contributes to storm water management. <BR /><BR />  

Location:  Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR />

Firm:  Tsoi/Kobus & Associates<BR />

Architect:  Richard Kobus, FAIA, FACHA<BR />

EXTERIOR DETAIL

The Green Guide for Healthcare was used as a design tool to help maximize natural light in the interior spaces, emphasize specifications of non-toxic, locally sourced building materials, low VOC and PVC-free finishes, materials with high recycled content and a ?green? operational approach to maintenance.<BR /><BR />  

Location:  Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR />

Firm:  Tsoi/Kobus & Associates<BR />

Architect:  Richard Kobus, FAIA, FACHA<BR />

NURSE STATION

Each floor is designed as a unique global habitat (grasslands, rainforest, ocean, lake and desert).<BR /><BR />  

Location:  Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR />

Firm:  Tsoi/Kobus & Associates<BR />

Architect:  Richard Kobus, FAIA, FACHA<BR />

CIRCLE SEAT

A pediatric care environment presents a significant interior design challenge: it needs to feel welcoming and appeal to infants, toddlers, young adults and adult visitors as part of a holistically integrated architectural design statement.<BR /><BR />  

Location:  Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR />

Firm:  Tsoi/Kobus & Associates<BR />

Architect:  Richard Kobus, FAIA, FACHA<BR />

FLOOR PLAN

Most significantly, the project team?s application of Lean Design principles resulted in a highly efficient decentralized floor plan. <BR /><BR />  

Location:  Minneapolis, Minnesota<BR />

Firm:  Tsoi/Kobus & Associates<BR />

Architect:  Richard Kobus, FAIA, FACHA<BR />

Design Solution

This project entailed construction of a new 319,551 square-foot, pediatric inpatient bed tower (including 88,025 square feet below-grade parking) on the University of Minnesota Medical School’s Riverside Campus. One of nine hospitals under Fairview Health Services’ management, the seven-story facility successfully consolidates all pediatric programs and inpatient units. The project concept started with a simple, yet challenging vision: to create the ideal environment in which to provide and receive children’s healthcare. In response, the hospital is primarily designed to support the organization’s mission to empower patients and involve families in a child’s care. Collaboration and communication were essential core drivers in the development of a design strategy that could support and strengthen this mission. Key project components included a focus on designing for safety, increasing efficiency and caregiver time spent with patients, and creating a distinctly memorable brand identity through an architecturally integrated theme: “Passport to Discovery.” Lean and evidence-based design research was crucial in informing these design solutions. The result is a unique pediatric hospital that facilitates research and knowledge-sharing, speeding the rate of innovative discovery to the patients’ bedside in an appropriate, comfortable and safe environment for care and healing.

Jury Comments

This is well done. It exhibits best practices in planning, integrated way finding, wonderful materials and sophisticated interior moves. The staff/service circuiting is well thought out as well as the patient room design to provide a quiet, family centered environment. The interior spaces read graphically with forms, colors, surprise and delight for children. It is colorful and playful without being cliché.

Photo Credits

© Nick Merrick of Hedrich Blessing

Back to 2013 Recipients page

 

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